The Physician and Sportsmedicine
Menubar Home Journal Personal Health Resource Center CME Advertiser Services About Us

January 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 1 - JANUARY 96


Neck Injuries: Urgent Decisions and Actions

When an athlete suffers a neck injury, the team physician must work quickly to provide trauma care or rule out serious cervical injuries. The authors outline a simple but accurate approach that relies on a targeted history and directed physical exam.

John Wiesenfarth, MD, MS; William Briner, Jr, MD


Sports and Exercise During Acute Illness: Recommending the Right Course for Patients

Many active athletes view getting sick as "getting behind" in their training. For those patients who are reluctant to ease up, physicians need to consider the sport and the type of illness to make sound recommendations. When working out may worsen the illness, result in impaired performance, or infect others, it's time for a "time out."

William A. Primos, Jr, MD

Patient Adviser: Exercising-or Not-When You Are Sick

William A. Primos, Jr, MD; with James R. Wappes


ECG Quiz: An Irregular Pulse in a Skydiver

A 29-year-old man with no cardiac or pulmonary symptoms had an irregular heartbeat on a preemployment physical exam. After looking at his ECG, see if you can make a diagnosis—and decide if he should be hired for a stressful job.

John D. Cantwell, MD


Nontraumatic Hip Pain in Active Children: A Critical Differential

A case report describing an active child who had Legg-Calvé-Perthes (LCP) disease illustrates the importance of considering the many nontraumatic causes of hip pain in this population. In addition to detailing the presentation of LCP, the authors outline keys to recognizing slipped capital femoral epiphysis, septic arthritis, transient synovitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and bone tumor.

Lynda F. Gerberg, MD; Lyle J. Micheli, MD


Diagnosis and Management of Exercise-Induced Asthma

The author of this comprehensive and current guide maintains that nearly all patients with exercise-induced asthma can be active—and he explains how. The article covers both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management and stresses the importance of rigorous patient education in controlling underlying asthma and EIA.

Ned T. Rupp, MEd, MD


Sports Medicine Groups 1996


Departments


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Editor's Notes
Medical Information Online: What's Now? What's Coming?


Editorial Board/Staff


Highlights


News Briefs
Going Online: Sports Medicine and More
Relief for Exercise Incontinence


Reviewer Thanks


Pearls


Forum


CME Self Test


Exercise Adviser
Strengthening the Hip Abductors
Michael Ross, MSEd, PT


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


RETURN TO BACK ISSUES INDEX

HOME  |   JOURNAL  |   PERSONAL HEALTH  |   RESOURCE CENTER  |   CME  |   ADVERTISER SERVICES  |   ABOUT US  |   SEARCH