The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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February 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 2 - FEBRUARY 96


Blunt-Trauma Carotid Artery Injury: Mild Symptoms May Disguise Serious Trouble

Even relatively minor blunt carotid artery trauma can set the scene for catastrophic complications, as it did in a pick-up football player described in this article. To alert physicians to the neurologic changes that occur when a hyperextension injury or direct blow injures the carotid artery, the authors outline steps in the neurologic exam and urge diligent follow-up and treatment.

Sandra Carr, MD; Bryan Troop, MD; Joseph Hurley, MD; Richard Pennell, MD


Emergengies

Meningococcemia: Heading Off a Killer

The author's experience with an outbreak of meningococcal disease shows that a high index of suspicion and quick treatment and prevention efforts can control the spread of the illness. Although meningococcemia is rare, physicians should always watch for it, particularly in closed settings such as sports camps.

Warren B. Howe, MD


How I Manage Tennis and Golfer's Elbow

Physicians routinely see lateral and medial epicondylitis in patients who grip work or sports equipment. This question-and-answer article offers helpful diagnostic illustrations, treatment guidelines, methods for recognizing the offending pain and modifying sports activities, as well as a patient handout on rehabilitation.

Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD; with Patrice Heinz Schelkun

Patient Adviser: Home Exercises for Tennis and Golfer's Elbow

Jo A. Hannafin, MD, PhD; with Patrice Heinz Schelkun


Exercise Is Medicine

Exercise should be first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases, according to this commentary. Here and in the accompanying patient handout, the author explains the power of this prescription and how to motivate patients to start a safe, enjoyable-and possibly life-saving-exercise routine.

Harold Elrick, MD

Patient Adviser: Exercise—the Best Medicine
Harold Elrick, MD


Imaging Quiz: Closed Reduction of an Everted Patella

A 29-year-old woman fell while skiing, heard a "pop" in her left knee, and was immediately in extreme pain. After looking at radiographs of her everted, laterally displaced patella, see if you can determine the next treatment step.

Richard B. Ganong, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Sleepers: The Subtle Ills That Keep Us Awake


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Editorial Board/Staff


News Briefs
Injury Survey Raises Concerns


Pearls


Forum


Highlights


Rehab Adviser
Recovering From Shoulder Pain: Tips for Swimmers
Alvin R. Loosli, MD; June Quick, RPT, ATC


Information for Authors


Calendar


Change of Address Information


Nutrition Adviser
Healthy Cooking: There's No Place Like Home
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Exercise Adviser
Blending Exercise Into Family Life
Daniel S. Fick, MD; Stephen J. Goff, PhD


CME Self Test


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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