The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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April 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 4 - APRIL 96


Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg: Steps for Expedient Return to Activity

The pain of chronic exertional compartment syndrome can waylay a seasoned athlete's training routine. And a weekend warrior who overdoes it risks the acute syndrome. The authors outline keys to diagnosis and treatment of both forms of the disorder. For some patients, activity modification may be enough to alleviate symptoms, but others require fasciotomy.

Peter Edwards, MD; Mark S. Myerson, MD


Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognizing the Condition, 'Reactivating' the Patient

Treating infectious mononucleosis (IM) in an athlete poses unique challenges: IM is sometimes harder to diagnose in athletes, and the risk of splenic rupture gives return-to-activity decisions added importance. The good news is that athletes tend to recover from IM faster than nonathletes, though it may take 4 to 6 months for an elite athlete to regain top form.

E. Randy Eichner, MD


ECG Quiz: Can This College Athlete Compete?

A 20-year-old male college sprinter and hurdler was seen in a cardiology assessment to follow up on a heart murmur first discovered when he was 10. After looking at his resting ECG, decide if you would let him compete.

John D. Cantwell, MD


Managing ACL Injuries in Children: Are Kids' Injuries Different?

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children, though less frequent than in adults, occur more often than previously thought. With a case report, the authors describe the typical findings and steps to diagnosis. Treatment depends on the type of ACL injury a child has, as well as on his or her skeletal maturity.

Michael Lastihenos, MD; Stephen J. Nicholas, MD


Assessing Acute Abdominal Pain: A Team Physician's Challenge

For the team physician treating an athlete who has abdominal pain, the first decision is whether surgery is needed; the second is when the athlete can return to play. The author shows how to use a thorough, practical history and physical exam to make an accurate diagnosis.

Roy T. Bergman, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
When to Let Your Patient Back Into the Game


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Nutrition Adviser
Protein Power
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Highlights


Editorial Board/Staff


Calendar


News Briefs
With Magic Back, What Are the Medical Messages?
Noteworthy


Pearls


Employment Opportunities


Exercise Adviser
The 'Super Six' Strengtheners for Golfers
James L. Chappuis, MD; Gregory D. Johnson, MS, ATC; Kevin Murphy, PT, DC


CME Self Test


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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