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[EXERCISE ADVISER]

The 'Super Six'Strengtheners for Golfers

James L. Chappuis, MD; Gregory D. Johnson, MS, ATC; Kevin Murphy, PT, DC

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 4 - APRIL 96


Some golfers believe that muscle-strengthening exercises, particularly weight lifting, will hurt their golf game. That's a myth. If you're a golfer, you're an athlete, so you should train as the pros do. They recognize that a stronger and more flexible body will help keep their scores down.

As an added attraction, strengthening exercises can fit nicely into a golfer's busy schedule because they require very little equipment or time. You can do the "super six" exercises shown here (figures 1 through 6) at home or while traveling to tone your body and your golf game. All you need is about 4 to 6 feet of surgical tubing, which can be found at many pharmacies, or an elastic exercise band, and about 10 minutes. Just follow these guidelines:

  • Stretch before and after you do strengthening exercises.
  • Be cautious. Don't try any exercise that might aggravate an injury or impairment.
  • Perform each exercise in three sets of 10 repetitions each, at least three times a week. Gradually work up to three sets of 15 repetitions. Hold each exercise for 2 seconds. Once the exercises become easy, add resistance by shortening the tubing or doubling it over.
  • Stretch the rubber tubing with a slow, steady motion, and release the tubing with a similar motion. Always keep tension in the tubing.
  • Expect a little soreness, but pain should not linger. If you feel pain 2 hours after the exercise, discontinue the program and consult a doctor, physical therapist, or trainer.
  • Anchor the tubing securely so it can handle the tension you put on it. Tying it to the knob of a closed door or to solid furniture works well.

Remember that although these exercises can help your game, they aren't meant to be all-inclusive. For example, you can add partial sit-ups to strengthen your abdominal (stomach) muscles. And, depending on your health, age, and medical history, your doctor may recommend additional exercises for your back, neck, or wrist muscles.

Also keep in mind that a good exercise program is most effective in improving your health and golf game when combined with regular stretching exercises(1), attention to good posture, and proper golfing technique. A professional golf instructor can help you translate your stronger muscles into longer shots, improved endurance, and a lower score.

[FIGURE 1] [FIGURE 2] [FIGURE 3] [FIGURE 4] [FIGURE 5] [FIGURE 6]

Reference

  1. Chappuis JL, Johnson GD: The 'super six' stretches for golfers. Phys Sportsmed 1995;23(4):87-88

Remember: This information is not intended as a substitute for medical treatment. Before starting an exercise program, consult a physician.

Dr Chappuis is the medical director of the Greater Atlanta Spine Center in Atlanta. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Mr Johnson is the program director of the Greater Atlanta Spine Center and a former athletic trainer for the Professional Golfers' Association of America tour. He is a fellow of the American Back Society. Dr Murphy is a physical therapist and the director of chiropractic at the Greater Atlanta Spine Center.


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