The Physician and Sportsmedicine
Menubar Home Journal Personal Health Resource Center CME Advertiser Services About Us

[EDITOR'S NOTES]

Breaking Our Own Rules

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 5 - MAY 96


This month in The Physician and Sportsmedicine we're breaking one of our own cardinal rules: We're publishing a research article. Those of you who've read my opinion about why we don't publish research may wonder if the journal is changing its focus from—as our cover proclaims—practical primary care.

On the contrary: Though "Sparring and Cognitive Function in Professional Boxers" compares training regimens and cognitive function test results among professional boxers, the issues raised speak to all of us who take care of people engaged in contact sports. Decreases in cognitive function among professional boxers appear to be linked more with sparring (including blows to the head) than with matches, according to authors Barry D. Jordan, MD, and colleagues. We need to think about the head blows our patients are taking—even in "noncontact" sports like soccer.

Meanwhile, Warren A. Scott, MD, argues that if you're treating active seniors differently than younger patients, you may be inadvertently ageist. In his article, "Treating Injuries in Active Seniors," Scott, who takes care of many masters athletes, advises to keep the treatment emphasis on rehab and prevention strategies—much the same as with younger patients.

Also in this issue, by authors Robert P. Nirschl, MD, MS, and Barry S. Kraushaar, MD, see "Assessment and Treatment Guidelines for Elbow Injuries," and the accompanying Patient Adviser, "Keeping Tennis Elbow at Arm's Length".

Hope to see many of you at ACSM later this month.

Cordially,
Richard H. Strauss, MD
Editor-in-Chief
P.S. Coming this spring: Look for us on the World Wide Web!


RETURN TO MAY 1996 TABLE OF CONTENTS

HOME  |   JOURNAL  |   PERSONAL HEALTH  |   RESOURCE CENTER  |   CME  |   ADVERTISER SERVICES  |   ABOUT US  |   SEARCH