The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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May 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 5 - MAY 96


Assessment and Treatment Guidelines for Elbow Injuries

Physicians may encounter three different types of elbow injuries: acute, chronic, and acute-on-chronic. The authors guide readers through the management of all three types and stress the importance of a detailed history and physical exam in making a specific diagnosis.

Robert P. Nirschl, MD, MS; Barry S. Kraushaar, MD

Patient Adviser: Keeping Tennis Elbow at Arm's Length: Simple, Effective Strengthening Exercises

Robert P. Nirschl, MD, MS; Barry S. Kraushaar, MD


Treating Injuries in Active Seniors

How should physicians manage active seniors' injuries? Just as they would younger patients'. The emphasis of rehab and injury prevention should be to improve strength and flexibility. By assuming that these patients want to remain active, physicians can help them overcome common obstacles—overuse injuries and arthritis—with medication, stretching, strength training, and encouragement.

Warren A. Scott, MD; with Gerald Secor Couzens


Imaging Quiz: Blunt Facial Trauma From a Bungee Jump

After walking away from a bungee jumping accident, a 28-year-old man came to the emergency room with such severe facial swelling that he was unrecognizable to his own family. After looking at a coronal CT, see if you can make the diagnosis.

Steven T. Kmucha, MD


Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder: Treating an Atypical Case

Although septic arthritis is usually seen in the very young, the very old, and people who are immunocompromised, a wrestler who fit none of these descriptions developed septic arthritis in his glenohumeral joint. This case illustrates why physicians need a high index of suspicion when a patient has insidious pain or restricted motion.

Thomas L. Pommering, DO; Randall R. Wroble, MD


Sparring and Cognitive Function in Professional Boxers

The more often and the more intensely a boxer spars, the more diminished his attention, concentration, and memory may be, suggest the results of neuropsychological testing in 42 male professional boxers. Performance on the tests was not associated with age, boxing record, length of career, or history of knockout or technical knockout.

Barry D. Jordan, MD; Eric J.T. Matser; Robert D. Zimmerman, MD; and Tania Zazula, PhD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Breaking Our Own Rules


Editorial Board/Staff


Pearls


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Change of Address Information


Highlights


Nutrition Adviser
A Delicate Mix: Avoiding Food-Drug Interactions
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Forum


Rehab Adviser
At-Home Knee Rehabilitation: Strengthening Without Special Equipment
Kris Jensen MS, PT, SCS


News Briefs
Refractive Surgery: Defining Rupture Risks
Noteworthy


CME Self Test


Exercise Adviser
Choosing a Life Preserver
Bryant Stamford, PhD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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