The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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August 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 8 - AUGUST 96


Guest Editorial: Ugh! Sports Physicals!

Douglas B. McKeag, MD, MS


Hamstring Strains: Expediting Return to Play

Hamstring strains tend to be frustrating for both physician and patient: They are often recurrent and take a long time to heal, and there is no consensus on the best rehabilitation path. The authors outline what is currently known about these strains and, using case reports, explain how to recognize and treat different types of strains.

Thomas M. Best, MD, PhD; William E. Garrett, Jr, MD, PhD


Contraindications to Athletic Participation: Cardiac, Respiratory, and Central Nervous System Conditions

In this first part of a two-part series on contraindications to sports participation, the author explains which cardiac, respiratory, and central nervous system conditions should keep an athlete out of the game.

James L. Moeller, MD


Office Management of Scaphoid Fractures

Scaphoid fractures, often the result of a fall onto an outstretched hand, are signaled by a dull, deep pain. Although the majority of these fractures heal successfully, certain scaphoid fractures require prolonged immobilization and can have poor results. The author stresses the importance of determining the location, stability, and orientation of the fracture because these factors guide treatment and predict outcome.

Greg Gutierrez, MD


Immediate Management of Epistaxis: Bloody Nuisance or Ominous Sign?

This collection of eight illustrative examples spans the range of epistaxis severity—from a child's recurrent nosebleed after nose picking to an adult's cocaine use to a basketball player taking an elbow to the nose. Because epistaxis may signal a serious disease such as coagulation disorder or tumor, physicians must be alert for unusual signs and symptoms while stopping the bleeding.

Terence M. Davidson, MD; Daniel Davidson


ECG Quiz: Chest Pain in a College Football Player

A 21-year-old football player had an acute onset of severe chest pain on the first day of practice. After looking at the results of his electrocardiogram and computed tomography scan, see if you can make the diagnosis.

John D. Cantwell, MD; Drew V. Miller, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Musculoskeletal Medicine: What Primary Care Docs Should Know


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Pearls


Editorial Board/Staff


Nutrition Adviser
Antioxidant Answers
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Calendar


Highlights


News Briefs
The Sports Physical: A Good Time for 'Hep B' Shots?
Noteworthy


Job Opportunities


Change of Address Information


Exercise Adviser
Foot Odor: How to Clear the Air
Michael L. Ramsey, MD


CME Self Test


Information for Authors


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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