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[EDITOR'S NOTES]

Musculoskeletal Medicine: What Primary Care Docs Should Know

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 8 - AUGUST 96


A good primary physician has the hardest job in medicine: He or she must know at least a moderate amount about every disease or injury that affects Americans.

Muscle problems, acute injuries such as sprained ankles, overuse injuries of the wrist, shoulder, neck or lower back—these conditions alone make up about 10% of the problems seen by primary physicians. But how much training do primary physicians have in this area? Family physicians get the most: 1 or 2 months of training in orthopedic medicine and surgery. But internal medicine residents get none. All of us go into practice underprepared to handle a whopping one out of ten patients we'll see in a given day.

So what do we do? We train on the job—and study up. We go to meetings for hands-on training in good examination techniques. But most of all we read, and that's where The Physician and Sportsmedicine comes in.

In every issue, The Physician and Sportsmedicine provides practical information about how to diagnose and treat the next patient who walks through your door. Not just the athlete, whom you rarely see, but the weekend tennis player or gardener or walker. These are the patients you see most often, and The Physician and Sportsmedicine gives you the tools to manage them efficiently, effectively, and for the long term.

In these days of managed care and an increasing role for primary care physicians, musculoskeletal medicine is important for you. Even if you never see an "athlete," sports medicine is part of your practice.

Cordially,
Richard H. Strauss, MD
Editor-in-Chief




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