The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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September 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 9 - SEPTEMBER 96


Detecting and Treating Common Foot and Ankle Fractures. Part 1: The Ankle and Hindfoot

In this first of two articles, the author describes common ankle and hindfoot fractures that can be managed conservatively, as well as more severe fractures that require surgery. Radiographic examples illustrate diagnosis and treatment.

David B. Thordarson, MD


Aggressive Acne Treatment: As Simple as One, Two, Three?

Active patients who suffer from acne usually want not just healing skin, but clear skin. Accordingly, the authors outline a three-step treatment plan designed to maximize the chance of completely eliminating acne.

Ronald C. Savin, MD; Lisa M. Donofrio, MD


Imaging Quiz: A Swollen, Painful Elbow

A woman had a swollen, painful elbow with limited range of motion after her right arm was forcefully internally rotated behind her back. After looking at a lateral radiograph of her elbow, see if you can make the diagnosis and recommend treatment.

Jane T. Servi, MD; Robert J. Johnson, MD


Contraindications to Athletic Participation: Spinal, Systemic, Dermatologic, Paired-Organ, and Other Issues

In this second part of two articles on contraindications to activity, the author describes numerous conditions—such as spondylolysis, Marfan syndrome, and herpes—that may or may not rule out or limit an athlete's participation in sports. A table that grades activities by their level of impact and intensity will help physicians make the best return-to-play decisions.

James L. Moeller, MD


Evaluating and Treating Active Patients for Anemia

Although some active patients who have anemia may simply need iron supplementation, physicians need to look diligently for the cause. The problem can vary from poor nutrition to peptic ulcer disease. And, as is illustrated by a case report included here, the stoicism of an athlete can mask the causative illness.

Raymond J. Browne, MD, MPH


Bracing for Activity

For injured athletes who want to get back in the game, the right kind of brace might make a difference. Physicians can help by becoming familiar with the braces on the market, understanding their patients' activities, and discerning their patients' expectations and concerns.

Susan Wichmann and D.R. Martin


Departments


Editor's Notes
Congratulations to the Unsung Olympic Heroes


Pearls


Highlights


News Briefs
Tracking the 'Fen-Phen' Drug Trend


Nutrition Adviser
In High Spirits? Alcohol and Your Health
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Editorial Board/Staff


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Change of Address Information


CME Self Test


Exercise Adviser
Cross-Training: Giving Yourself a Whole-Body Workout
Bryant Stamford, PhD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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