The Physician and Sportsmedicine
Menubar Home Journal Personal Health Resource Center CME Advertiser Services About Us

October 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 10 - OCTOBER 96


Neck Pain: Part 1: Narrowing the Differential

When an active person is hindered by neck pain or related upper-limb pain, the possible causes are as diverse as muscle strains, radiculopathy, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Despite a grab bag of possibilities, the history and physical exam are often enough to make the diagnosis. A key question: Is the pain local or radiating?

Richard L. Aptaker, DO


Pitted Keratolysis: A Common Infection of Active Feet

Athletes who get hot, sweaty feet while playing sports may contract pitted keratolysis. The condition produces a look and a smell that generally leave little doubt about the diagnosis. Careful foot hygiene and attention to footwear may be enough to clear the infection, but if not, topical agents are the next step.

Michael L. Ramsey, MD


Detecting and Treating Common Fractures of the Foot and Ankle: Part 2: The Midfoot and Forefoot

Concluding this generously illustrated series, the author describes treatment for fractures of the navicular, metatarsals, sesamoids, and toes. Many sports-related fractures of these bones can be treated conservatively with casting or wooden shoes, but tarsometatarsal disruption and Jones fractures often require surgery.

David B. Thordarson, MD


Guidelines for Managing Concussion in Sports: A Persistent Headache

Published guidelines are far from uniform in their advice about managing athletes who sustain concussions. The scarcity of scientific evidence makes practical decisions about when an athlete can safely return to the field difficult. Consensus-building efforts are underway, but controversy persists around such questions as whether a brief loss of consciousness suggests a severe concussion.

Robert Roos


When Is Disqualification From Sports Justified? Medical Judgment vs Patients' Rights

Suppose an athlete has a physical abnormality that would pose a serious risk if he or she played a sport. The team physician advises against participation, and the athlete is disqualified. But the athlete, citing laws designed to protect the disabled, claims a right to participate. What happens next? The author discusses how courts have been dealing with such disputes.

Matthew J. Mitten, JD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Living on the Edge—Carefully


Editorial Board/Staff


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Nutrition Adviser
Nutrition Knowledge: Answers to the Top Ten Questions
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Pearls


Forum


Highlights


News Briefs
AHA Panel Outlines Sudden-Death Screening Standards


Calendar


Rehab Adviser
Using RICE for Injury Relief
Thomas D. Rizzo, Jr, MD


Exercise Adviser
Exercising When You're Overweight: Getting in Shape and Shedding Pounds
Richard B. Parr, EdD


CME Self Test


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


RETURN TO BACK ISSUES INDEX

HOME  |   JOURNAL  |   PERSONAL HEALTH  |   RESOURCE CENTER  |   CME  |   ADVERTISER SERVICES  |   ABOUT US  |   SEARCH