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[EDITOR'S NOTES]

'Activity Medicine' for Patients 8 to 80

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 11 - NOVEMBER 96


How old was your most recent patient?

Was he a baggy-trousered teenage skateboarder with a wrist fracture? A 40-something programmer with carpal tunnel syndrome? A retired teacher with neck pain that slowed her mornings—and her swimming?

Chances are you're seeing patients of every age. And you're finding that, like exercise, "activity medicine" helps people of all ages and abilities.

Generally, the healthiest and happiest people of all ages are those who stay physically and mentally fit. (Occasionally, an individual who never walks farther than the refrigerator lives to be 100, but that's rare.) People might choose to move because they enjoy a certain sport or activity, or they might just prefer real-life action to the televised variety. In any case, people who are active like to stay active, even though they sometimes run into medical problems in the process.

That's where physicians come in. We can help patients stay active despite a medical condition, and we can optimize injury healing, helping patients return to their activities as soon as possible. Often we find that exercise is part of disease management.

Throughout the year,The Physician and Sportsmedicine brings you information that will help you with patients of all ages, with a variety of medical problems. In this issue, author Christopher Van Tilburg, MD, describes injuries common in the typically younger crowd of board sports enthusiasts ("Surfing, Windsurfing, Snowboarding, and Skateboarding: Medical Aspects of Board Sports," page 62). In her feature "Sports Medicine in the Workplace: Adapting—and Expanding—Your Practice," contributing editor Jacqueline White explores the role of "activity medicine" among adults in the work setting. And Richard L. Aptaker, DO, in his article "Neck Pain: Part 2. Optimizing Treatment and Rehabilitation," describes treatment for both injury-related and degenerative causes of neck pain, which often affects older adults.

So, no matter what your practice pattern, keep coming back. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, like exercise, is for everyone.

Cordially,
Richard H. Strauss, MD
Editor-in-Chief


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