The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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November 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 11 - NOVEMBER 96


Managing Successive Minor Head Injuries: Which Tests Guide Return to Play?

A college basketball player suffered two head injuries a month apart, and the second one left her with a persistent headache, reversal of hand dominance, and cognitive difficulties.The authors detail the process of discovering and documenting the patient's neurologic deficits, including the role of neuropsychological testing.

Margot Putukian, MD; Ruben J. Echemendia, PhD


Swimmer's Shoulder: Targeting Treatment

Swimmers who put in long hours of training often develop shoulder pain from pressure on subacromial tissues. The problem may be compounded in adolescents because of their skeletal immaturity. The authors use the case of a 14-year-old girl to describe the diagnostic work-up and treatment, which included changing the patient's swimming workout to alleviate overuse.

Scott M. Koehler, MD; David C. Thorson, MD


Neck Pain: Part 2: Optimizing Treatment and Rehabilitation

When a patient has neck pain of nontraumatic origin, a key part of treatment is simply reassuring the patient that the condition isn't serious. Other steps include using nonsteroidal medication, icing, and possibly other measures for pain relief. When physical therapy is needed, addressing the entire kinetic chain is an important part of rehabilitation.

Richard L. Aptaker, DO


Surfing, Windsurfing, Snowboarding, and Skateboarding: Medical Aspects of Board Sports

Board sports enthusiasts—a fast-growing throng—face a variety of injury risks. Physicians can help them stay healthy by informing them about the need for proper equipment and protective gear, the value of lessons, and the wisdom of keeping a sharp eye on weather and terrain.

Christopher Van Tilburg, MD


Identifying Exercise Allergies: Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis and Cholinergic Urticaria

Cholinergic urticaria and exercise-induced anaphylaxis are two exercise-related allergies that can be hard to tell apart. Given the serious danger posed by anaphylaxis, quick diagnosis is important. The patient's history and the size of the wheals offer the best clues.

Tom Terrell, MD, MPhil; David O. HoughÝ, MD; Raquelle Alexander, MD


Sports Medicine in the Workplace: Adapting—and Expanding—Your Practice

Physicians versed in sports medicine may want to look to industry, where primary care skills are increasingly in demand. Aggressive rehab methods honed on athletes can also return workers to the job more quickly. The result? Physicians can expand their practices while helping employers save on worker's compensation costs.

Jacqueline White


Departments


Editor's Notes
'Activity Medicine' for Patients From 8 to 80


Editorial Board/Staff


Pearls


Coming in Sportsmedicine


News Briefs
Melatonin: A Trusty Travel Companion?
Noteworthy


Highlights


Forum


Information for Authors


Nutrition Adviser
Fruits and Veggies: Are You Getting Enough of a Good Thing?
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


CME Self Test


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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