The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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December 1996 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 24 - NO. 12 - DECEMBER 96

Detecting Graves' Disease: Presentations in Young Athletes

Graves' disease appears in many guises, and in some athletic patients it can look like overtraining. This review of three cases in young athletes suggests the broad range of possible presentations. The case reports are used to illustrate a concise guide to the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

David H. Wang, MD, MS; Scott M. Koehler, MD; Cary N. Mariash, MD


Managing Migraines in Active People

Physical activity can cut either way with regard to migraine headache: It provokes attacks in some sufferers and may help to prevent or lessen attacks in others. The physician's challenge is to identify what triggers the attacks and to find an effective combination of lifestyle measures and abortive, pain-relief, or prophylactic medications—without debilitating side effects—to stop them.

Seymour Diamond, MD


Emergencies

When Anxiety Attacks: Treating Hyperventilation and Panic

Athletes often have performance anxiety before a game or competition, but sometimes the anxiety escalates to panic. An athlete who has a single panic attack needs reassurance and assessment to rule out a serious disorder. Repeated attacks may indicate panic disorder, which calls for a combination of psychological and pharmacologic therapy.

Aaron Rubin, MD; C. Mark Chassay, MD


Distal Biceps Rupture in a Snowboarder

A snowboarder who thrust out his arm to try to break a sideways fall heard a pop in his elbow and felt a sharp pain. Subsequent weakness on supination and elbow flexion, with other signs, pointed to a distal biceps rupture. Though this injury is less common than proximal rupture, recognition is important because surgery is necessary to preserve elbow flexion and supination strength.

James S. Williams, Jr, MD; David W. Hang, MD; Bernard R. Bach, Jr, MD


Portal Venous Thrombosis in a Backpacker: The Role of Exercise

Effort thrombosis usually involves an extremity, but in this backpacker's case, arduous hiking and abdominal straining led to superior mesenteric and left portal vein thrombosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, leading to treatment with antibiotics and anticoagulants.

Mark Walsh, MD; James Moriarity, MD; Janice Peterson, MD; George Friend, MD; Rochelle Chodock; Michael Rogan, MD


1996 Annual Index


Departments


Editor's Notes
Finding Fun in Winter Workouts


Editorial Board/Staff


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Pearls


News Briefs
Fortifying Students Against Steroid Use


Forum


Highlights


Information for Authors


Index to Advertisers


CME Self Test


Calendar


Patient Adviser
Controlling Herpes


Rehab Adviser
Heart Attack Counterattack: Fighting Back Against Heart Disease
Barry A. Franklin, PhD


Exercise Adviser
Sports Bras and Briefs:Choosing Good Athletic Support
Bryant Stamford, PhD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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