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Olympic Medical Scans


August 6, 1996

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  • The International Olympic Committee (IOC) on Monday (August 5) in Atlanta announced that two track and field athletes tested positive for steroids, according to a report by the Associated Press. Iva Prandzheva, a Bulgarian triple jumper who finished fourth in her event, tested positive for metandienone. Natalya Shekodanova, a Russian hurdler who finished seventh in the 100-m hurdles, tested positive for stanozolol. The women were disqualified and their results thrown out. Prince Alexandre de Merode, chairman of the IOC Medical Commission, said that a backlog of tests is still being analyzed, and that he hoped all results would be analyzed by Wednesday.

August 5, 1996

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  • An International Olympic Committee arbitration panel on Sunday (August 4) ruled in favor of two Russian bronze medalists who had tested positive for bromantan and were stripped of their medals, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. The appeal was filed on July 29 by Andrei Korneyev, a swimmer, and Zakhar Gouliev, a wrestler. The International Olympic Committee had characterized bromantan as a banned stimulant. In their appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the athletes argued that the Russian delegation had used bromantan not to enhance performance, but to strengthen the athletes' immune systems for hot, humid conditions expected in Atlanta. In addition to testimony from the IOC and the Russian delegation, the CAS heard testimony from Prof. Holbrook of Mercer University in Atlanta. Though Holbrook said bromantan may be a performance-enhancing stimulant, he could not rule out the possibility that the drug was solely used to strengthen the immune system. In its ruling, the CAS said that evidence of bromantan's stimulant properties was not scientifically strong enough to warrant withdrawal of medals from athletes. The CAS also urged the Russian Olympic Committee to follow through on its earlier promise to stop using bromantan as long as doubts about its status are in question.

  • Relatively cool temperatures kept the number of medical incidents low for the men's marathon on Sunday (August 4), according to William O. Roberts, MD, who was on the ACOG medical team for endurance events and spectator care. Roberts is a family physician at MinnHealth SportsCare in White Bear Lake, Minnesota and an editorial board member of The Physician and Sportsmedicine. "The temperature was 74 degrees at the start [7 am] and humid, and the cloud cover kept the temperatures down. It remained cloudy until 2 hours and 40 minutes into the race, then turned hazy," he said. Roberts said that out of a field of 111, there were 10 to 15 dropouts; 45 athletes were treated at the end of the race, of which 20 were treated for heat-related problems. He said the medical team started intravenous lines on two athletes.

  • Tongan superheavyweight boxer Paea Wolfgramm won a silver medal Sunday (August 4) despite competing with a broken wrist, a broken nose, and health warnings from his coaches, according to a report by the Associated Press.

  • United States track and field competitor Butch Reynolds withdrew from the 1,600-m relay on Sunday (August 4) because of cramps in both hamstrings, according to a report by the Associated Press. Sore hamstrings had also forced him out of the 400-m event on July 28.

  • United States marathoner Keith Brantly, who finished 28th in the Olympic marathon on Sunday (August 4), didn't let an eye injury interfere with his Olympic plans, according to a report by the Associated Press. He was training in North Carolina in early July when he ran into a tree branch that pierced his left eyeball. Surgeons repaired the injury and Brantly continued training.

  • Algerian track and field competitor Noureddine Morceli won a gold medal on Saturday (August 3) in the 1,500-m event despite incurring a spiking injury on his right heel during the race, according to a report by the Associated Press.

  • The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for day 15 (Saturday, August 3) of the Olympics. The ACOG medical team treated 18 cases of heat related illness with no hospital transports. As of Saturday, 10% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 941 out of 9,468.

August 2, 1996

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  • United States basketball player Grant Hill sat out the team's semifinal game on Thursday (August 1) because of a twisted knee, according to a report by Reuter Information Service. His coach said Hill should be able to play in Saturday's final game.

  • Mia Hamm, the United States soccer player who sprained her left ankle in a preliminary round on July 23, played in her team's final game on Thursday (August 1) with a sore ankle, according to a report by the Associated Press. She came out for a substitute at the end of the game and did not join her teammates in a gold-medal victory lap around the stadium.

  • German equestrian jumper Franke Sloothaak injured his hand in a fall from his horse on Thursday (August 1), according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). The report said he received two stitches and will return to competition on Friday (August 2).

  • United States freestyle wrestler Lou Rosselli withdrew from competition Thursday (August 1) with a fractured right elbow, according to a report by the Associated Press.

  • Despite hamstring pain that caused her to withdraw from the heptathlon competition on July 28, United States track and field competitor Jackie Joyner-Kersee qualified for the long-jump finals on Thursday (August 1), according to a report by the Associated Press. Her husband and coach Bob Kersee said that an MRI exam shows scar tissue 2 in. wide and 2 cm deep in the hamstring.

  • Leroy Burrell, United States track and field competitor, withdrew from the US 400-m relay team on Thursday (August 1) because of heel tendinitis, according to a report by the Associated Press.

  • The sophisticated new mass spectrometers making their debut at the 1996 Olympic Summer Games were not the key to detecting the new banned substance bromantan, found in the samples of five Olympic athletes, said International Olympic Committee spokesperson Michele Verdier. In a press conference on Thursday (August 1), she said that the equipment is not used for detection of stimulants, only anabolic steroids.

  • Olympic marathoners are breathing easier this year because support vehicles that follow the course run on natural gas instead of gasoline, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. Natural gas vehicles emit far less pollution than gas-powered vehicles. Though a first in Olympic competition, the natural gas vehicles, provided by the American Gas Association Clean Air Team, have been used at the Peachtree Road Races in Atlanta and at races in Boston and Pittsburgh.

  • The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for days 11 and 12 of the Olympics (Tuesday, July 30 and Wednesday, July 31). On Tuesday the ACOG medical team treated 47 cases of heat related illness with no hospital transports. On Wednesday the ACOG medical team treated 40 cases of heat related illness with no hospital transports. As of Wednesday, 10% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 807 out of 8,166.

August 1, 1996

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  • Russian pole vaulter Sergei Bubka, a favorite to medal in his event, withdrew from competition Thursday (July 31) because an injured Achilles tendon was hampering his performance, according to a report by Scripps-McClatchy Western. He said an Achilles injury he sustained in April has worsened, and he reinjured it on July 25.

  • Ethiopian runner Haile Gebrselassie, who won the 10,000-m final, withdrew from the 5,000-m event Thursday (July 31), according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. He said his feet hurt badly after the 10,000 event because of the hard track surface.

  • Drug positives made the news again on Wednesday (July 31). The International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) have not officially announced the results of the latest round of drug tests, but sports sources told Reuters Information service that Russian sprinter Marina Trandenkova tested positive for the drug bromantan, a stimulant and masking agent. Three other Russians and one Lithuanian have also tested positive for the drug. Meanwhile, the Associated Press reported that an Irish 5,000-m runner, Marie McMahon, tested positive for a banned stimulant (phenylpropanolamine) found in a cold remedy. She reportedly took two Robitussin tables 2 days before her event without consulting team doctors. Irish team representatives also told the Associated Press that she had taken a painkiller for a sore leg.

  • More information is surfacing on bromantan, the new stimulant found in the urine samples of five Olympic athletes. Prince Alexandre de Merode, chairman of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) medical commission was interviewed by the Associated Press, and shares what he's learned from Russian officials and other international sources.

  • Sports psychologists have an increasing role in helping athletes cope with the pressure of competition. An Associated Press report documents the growth of the field, interviews sports psychologists, and talks to United States decathlete Dan O'Brien about the psychologic tactics he uses use.

  • Kayaker Heidi Lehrer, who competes for Antigua-Barbuda, continued to have problems Wednesday (July 30) after injuring her neck in a July 24 bus accident, according to a report by the Associated Press. She said her team physician told her she had a fractured cervical vertebra and advised her to go to an Atlanta hospital for a CT scan.

July 31, 1996

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  • On Tuesday (July 30) the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced that a fourth athlete has tested positive for a banned substance, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG).Russian swimmer Nina Juvaneskaia, who competed in the 200-m backstroke, was excluded from the games for the use of the drug bromantan, the same drug detected in the three other athletes who have been expelled from the games. In addition, the IOC suspended the Lithuanian cycling team physician until the 2000 Summer Olympic Games and Lithuanian cycling coach the remainder of the 1996 games because of drug-related offenses.

  • Several superheavy weightlifters were injured in competition Tuesday (July 30), according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Tom Ingalsbe of the United States tore an abdominal muscle while warming up for the clean and jerk, Mark Henry of the United States suffered a back injury during the snatch and the clean and jerk, Igor Halilov of Uzbekistan dislocated his elbow during the snatch, and Leonid Taranenko of Belarus was injured in the warm-up.

  • The team physician for the US swimming team had an unusual brush with fame while he was a medical resident, according to a report by Sports Illustrated Online. Craig Ferrell, MD, was a resident in the emergency room at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis on August 16, 1977, the night Elvis was brought to the hospital after a fatal drug overdose.

  • Want to know what's happening inside the body of an elite athlete navigating the Olympic marathon course? The Microsoft-National Broadcasting Corp (MSNBC) Web site has an downloadable interactive module on its Olympic page that takes you through the Olympic marathon course, stopping at mileposts 1, 10, 18, and 25 to update you on body temperature, fluid loss, oxygen consumption, and glycogen use. Alberto Salazar narrates his suggested race strategy at each stop.

  • The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for day 10 of the Olympics (Monday, July 29). The ACOG medical team treated 22 cases of heat related illness, including one hospital transport. A female volunteer was transported from Atlanta Fulton County Stadium at 4:30 pm when the heat index was 87°F (30°C); she was treated and released. So far, 10% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 680 out of 6,870.

July 30, 1996

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  • The Russian Olympic committee on Monday appealed the disqualification of two of its bronze medalists for positive drug tests, according to a report by the Associated Press. The appeal was submitted to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), which was established to settle athletic grievances on short notice. The Russians say that bromantan, the drug the athletes used, is not a stimulant and is not on the list of banned substances. The medical code of the International Olympic Committee uses the term "related substances" to cover drugs not listed by name. Jean-Philipe Rochat, CAS secretary general, told the Associated Press that the panel met for 90 minutes Monday before adjourning the hearing until Tuesday. He said a ruling is expected Tuesday night at the earliest.

  • United States long jumper Mike Powell pulled a groin muscle in his third of six jumps on Monday, dashing his medal hopes and ending his Olympic career, according to a report by Microsoft-National Broadcasting Corp. He was the world record holder in the long jump and was the runner-up to Carl Lewis in the 1988 and 1992 Olympic Games. After his third jump he limped out of the pit in obvious discomfort, then fouled on his fourth and fifth tries. He aborted his sixth jump and crumpled into the box, face first.

  • United States gymnast Kerri Strug's injured left ankle did not heal enough for her to compete in the floor finals on Monday night, despite aggressive physical therapy, according to a report by the Associated Press. She withdrew 45 minutes before the start of the session. Strug had been undergoing therapy sessions for her sprained ankle at the Emory University pool, where she was treated to some free lessons in synchronized swimming by the US national team, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG).

  • The defending Olympic champion in the women's 400-m hurdles, Sally Gunnell of Great Britain, was injured during semifinals Monday, according to a report by the Associated Press. She started limping just after the sixth hurdle, stopped short at the seventh, then fell to the ground. She had suffered an Achilles tendon injury to a left foot in a race in early July.

  • Ukranian weightlifter Ihor Razorenov, defending world champion in the 108-kg category, injured his back during warm up for the snatch competition and was transported to the hospital for testing, according to a report from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Another weightlifter in the event who was not able to compete was Mukhran Gogia from Georgia; he had a badly bruised hand, and his physician did not allow him to participate.

  • Sonia O'Sullivan of Ireland, expected to medal in women's middle-distance events, had to withdraw from Sunday's 5,000-m final because of diarrhea she experienced before the event, according to a report from Sports Illustrated Online.

  • The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for days 9 and 10 of the Olympics (Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28). On Saturday the ACOG medical team treated 18 cases of heat related illness with no hospital transports. On Sunday the ACOG medical team treated 36 cases of heat related illness, including one hospital transport. A 10-year-old male was transported at 3:50 pm from the Ocoee Whitewater Center when the heat index was 74°F (23°C); he was treated for dehydration and released. As of Sunday, 10% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 639 out of 6,461.

July 29, 1996

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  • Three doping cases were announced Sunday (July 28) by the International Olympic Committee. All three cases involved bromantan, a stimulant and reported masking agent, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Russian swimmer Andrei Korneev was stripped of a bronze medal he won in the 200-m breaststroke, and Russian Greco-Roman wrestler Zafar Gouliev was stripped of a bronze medal he won in the 48-kg weight class. The 13th place finish of Lithuanian sprint cycler Rita Razmaite was cancelled. IOC spokesperson Michele Verdier says bromantan appears to be a new drug with effects that are similar to mesocarbe. She said that this is the first time in the Olympic Games that bromantan has been found.

  • Hamstring injuries altered the course of athletics events over the weekend. In the 400-m semifinals on Sunday (July 28), US sprinter Butch Reynolds was rounding the first turn when he slowed, grabbed his right hamstring, grimaced in pain, collapsed on the track, and crawled to the infield, according to a report by the Associated Press. His team doctor, Lawrence McGee, MD, said Reynolds had mild tightness and cramping in both hamstrings, and that Reynolds would probably be able to compete in the 1,600-m relay on Aug 3. Also on Sunday (July 28), US heptathlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee withdrew from her event after experiencing difficulty at the end of her heat in the 100-m hurdles, according to a report by Scripps Howard. She was competing with a heavily bandaged right hamstring, which she had reinjured 2 weeks ago. Her husband and coach Bob Kersee said she has had recurring problems from scar tissue in her hamstring from a 1991 injury.

  • Achilles tendon injuries stunted Olympic competition for two athletes. On Sunday, high hurdler Henry Andrade, competing for Cape Verde, tried to compete with an Achilles tendon rupture and his ankle heavily strapped, according to a report from Reuter Information Service. He hobbled for two paces, then limped to the side of the track. On Friday, Finnish shot putter Mika Halvari narrowly failed to qualify for the finals; he had been sidelined with an Achilles injury from February until 2 weeks before the Olympics.

  • Italian archer Paola Fantato competed on Sunday (July 28) from her wheelchair, according to a report from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). After competing for several years in the Paralympics, this is her first Olympic Games. Fantato contracted polio when she was 8 months old. She can walk with difficulty, but must compete from a wheelchair to steady the bow.

  • Temperatures were cool for the women's marathon on Sunday (July 28). Cloudy, drizzly skies at the start of the race kept the temperature around 70, according to a report from Runners World Online. US Olympic Marathon Trials winner Jenny Spangler dropped out with Achilles tendon pain at mile 11. US marathoner Anne Marie Lauck finished 10th and collapsed at the finish line from leg cramps that triggered a dizzy spell. Of the 88 runners who started the race, 65 finished, according to a report from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). William O. Roberts, MD, was on the ACOG medical team that covered the women's marathon. Roberts is a family physician at MinnHealth SportsCare in White Bear Lake, Minnesota and an editorial board member of The Physician and Sportsmedicine. "Luckily for the athletes, it was a cool day by Atlanta standards," he says. "We treated about 21 people—nothing serious." Medically speaking, Roberts says today's 10K women's race walk was "uneventful."

  • South African runner Gwen Griffiths was released from the hospital Saturday (July 27) after slipping and falling on concrete flooring in the warm-up zone before a Friday night heat for her event, according to a report by Reuter Information Service. She was knocked unconscious. A South African team official said he hoped Griffiths would be recovered in time to compete in the 1,500-m event.

  • Australian middleweight boxer Justann Crawford was hospitalized Friday after being punched on the back of the head—a possible foul blow—while on the ropes by Russian Alexander Lebziak, according to a report from Reuter Information Service. Crawford fell to the canvas and was unable to stand unaccompanied after the blow. He was helped back to his corner where he slumped while a doctor removed his headguard.

  • A water rescue volunteer broke his leg Thursday (July 25) while training at the Ocoee Whitewater Center, the day before competition was to begin, according to a report from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Eric Lutz, a swift-water instructor with the Tennessee Association of Rescue Squads, had been training for 2 years for his duties. He was practicing swimming below Humongous, the largest rapid on the course, when his foot became trapped under a rock.

  • The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for day 6 of the Olympics (Thursday, July 25). The ACOG medical team treated 15 cases of heat related illness, including one hospital transport. A 44-year-old female spectator was transported from the Georgia International Horse Park at 2:30 pm when the heat index was 83°F (28°C); she was treated for heat exhaustion and released. So far, 10% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 506 out of 4,874.

July 26, 1996

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  • United States rower Michael Peterson collapsed Thursday (June 25) after his team finished fourth in the semifinal event and was taken to the medical center, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). The report said that Peterson "had had an excessive build-up of blood sugar and lactic acid [lactic acidosis], which causes the victim to become unconscious. The condition comes from overworking the muscles."

  • Two athletes withdrew from the Olympics on Thursday (July 25) because of injuries, according to Reuter Information Service. Swedish high-jumper Patrik Sjoberg strained a thigh muscle in training for his event; he had won two silver medals and one bronze in the past three Olympics. South African marathon runner Xolile Yawa sustained a stress fracture of his femur while training in New Mexico.

  • The governing board for track-and-field events, the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) ruled Thursday (July 25) that two athletes who tested positive for banned substances before the Olympics can compete in events that start Friday (July 26). Australian sprinter Dean Capobianco tested positive for the steroid stanozolol in May and Italian high jumper Antonella Bevilacqua tested positive for ephedrine in May, according to Reuter Information Service. Saying that their rules were vague and may not have stood up in civil court, the IAAF referred the cases to arbitration hearings after the games. If arbitrators confirm the positive drug findings, the athletes' performances in Atlanta will be negated.

  • Athletes aren't the only ones who undergo testing for banned chemicals at the Olympic Games. Table tennis rackets are tested for illegal glue coatings that give the ball extra speed and spin. The rackets undergo tests for toxic vapor concentration. On Thursday (July 25) Sonia Touati, a Tunisian table tennis player, was defaulted in the second round match in the women's singles tournament for having an illegal racket, according to a report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games.

  • The first positive drug test of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games was announced Wednesday (July 24). Estela Rodriguez, a silver medalist in judo, tested positive for furosemide, a diuretic, according the The Atlanta-Journal Constitution. The substance was detected by a routine urine test after her competition Saturday (July 20) in the 72-kilo heavyweight class. The International Olympic Committee reprimanded her, but did not strip her medal. "It is not considered a doping case," said IOC spokeswoman Michele Verdier. "The athlete should have told the doctor of the Cuban team she was taking that drug." The Cuban delegation told the IOC that Rodriguez took an herbal remedy in Cuba in July 12 not knowing it contained a banned substance.

  • Because of clouds and periodic rain, Thursday (July 25) was the coolest day of the Olympics so far, with a high temperature of 82°F (28°)at the Centennial Olympic Park, according to the National Weather Service in Atlanta. The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated their medical statistics for day 5 of the Olympics (Wednesday, July 24). The ACOG medical team treated 71 cases of heat related illness, including three hospital transports. A 46-year-old female spectator was transported from the Georgia World Congress Center at 4:30 pm when the heat index was 90°F (33°C); she was treated for dehydration and released. A 53-year-old female spectator was transported from Stone Mountain at 5:54 pm when the heat index was 91°F (33°F); she was treated for heat exhaustion and released. A 17-year-old male International Youth Camp guest was transported from Underground Atlanta at 7:50 pm when the heat index was 90°F (33°C); he was treated for heat exhaustion and released. So far, 11% of all medical encounters have been heat related: 483 out of 4,299.

July 25, 1996

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  • Karl Malone of the United States basketball dream team hurt his right hand while blocking a shot Wednesday during a game against Lithuania, according to a USA Today report. He received seven stitches on the webbing between his fourth and fifth fingers, and may sit out Friday's game against China.

  • Painless tattoos are all the rage with athletes at the Olympic Village, according to an report by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Liz Mendel, who works as a massage therapist in the morning, applies a transfer outline, then fills in the lines with an alcohol-based tempra paint. They last from 1 to 5 days, depending on the skin chemistry, sweat, and humidity.

  • According to a preliminary report released Wednesday by the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 11% of all medical encounters to date have been heat related: 389 out of 3,625. Of 50 cases of heat-related illnesses reported for day 4 of the Olympics (July 23), five patients required transport to the hospital. One athlete (age and sex unavailable), transported from the Georgia World Congress Center at 4:55 pm when the heat index at the venue was 91°F (33°C), was treated for dehydration and released. The other four cases occurred at the Georgia International Horse Park, which reached a peak heat index of 94°F (34°C) at 2 pm and stayed constant until about 4 pm. A 32-year-old female was treated for heat exhaustion and released, a 39-year-old female was treated for dehydration and released, a 31-year-old female was treated for heat exhaustion and released, and a 22-year-old female was treated for dehydration and released.

  • Heidi Lehrer, a kayaker from Antigua, was injured Wednesday in bus accident, according to reports from the Associated Press and USA Today. The athlete reported neck pain, transported to the hospital for x-rays and treatment, and released.

July 24, 1996

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  • United States gymnast Kerri Strug was diagnosed with a grade 3 lateral ankle sprain Tuesday night after competition that won the United States its first-ever gold medal in US women's team gymnastics, according to a USA Today report. Strug said she heard a pop in her left ankle during the first of her two vaults. Despite the first injury, she completed her second vault successfully with a score of 9.712. The injury dims Strug's hopes of competing in upcoming individual events.

  • United States soccer player Mia Hamm sprained her left ankle in a collision with a Swedish opponent Tuesday, according to a report by the Associated Press. X-rays revealed no fracture, and team officials said Hamm will likely sit out a preliminary-round games with China on Thursday so that she can play in Sunday's semifinals.

  • Australian rider Wendy Schaeffer is competing in 3 days of equestrian events with a fractured right leg, according to a news report from the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG). Schaeffer fractured her leg in mid May at a horse trial shortly after being named to the Olympic team. Because she could not compete while wearing a plaster cast, the surgeons placed plates and pins in her leg. When not on her horse, she wears an electromagnetic stimulation pack strapped to her leg.

  • Italian fencer Diana Bianchedi completed and won a preliminary bout against her Chinese opponent, despite rupturing her Achilles tendon, according to a report by the the Associated Press. Her leg was casted and she was replaced by a teammate.

  • A team doctor for Austrian Olympic team said judo fighter Eric Krieger, injured in a heavyweight quarterfinal bout Saturday night, has "a damaged neck vertebra," according to a report by Reuter Information Service. Krieger was origninally thought to have a spinal cord contusion.

  • Chinese air pistol shooter Yifu Wang, who collapsed after competing Saturday in the 10-meter air pistol event, needed oxygen again after competing in the 50-meter free pistol event, according to a report by Reuter Information Service. Olympic official originally thought that Wang's fainting episode was heat related; however Chinese officials said that Wang's dizziness and headache symptoms symptoms began before the games.

July 22, 1996

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  • Austrian judo fighter Eric Krieger reportedly suffered a spinal cord contusion in the heavyweight quarterfinal bout Saturday night against French world champion David Douillet. According to a report by Reuter Information Service, Krieger was thrown off balance by Douillet and appeared to clash heads with his opponent as he was hurled onto the mat. He was treated by physicians at the scene, but transport to the hospital was delayed almost an hour because the ambulance at the arena had a dead battery. According to an Associated Press report, Krieger was released Sunday. Drouillet went on to win the gold medal.

  • Chinese air pistol shooter Yifu Wang collapsed Saturday after a last-shot error prevented him from retaining his Olympic title in the 10-meter event, according to a report by Reuter Information Service. Witnesses said he burst into tears after his defeat, then collapsed. In a press statement, John D. Cantwell, MD, chief medical officer for the Games said Wang's fainting episode was heat related. The high temperature at the shooting venue was 98.6°F (37°C); however, the final was held in an air-conditioned hall. "He was checked by the medical staff on site and he is very stable," Cantwell said. "All his vital signs are fine and he will now follow up with the Olympic village clinic, which will continue monitoring him." Wang will compete Tuesday in the 50-meter free pistol event.

  • The head of the Polish Olympic team, Eugeniusz Pietrasik, age 48, collapsed on the field during the Olympic opening ceremonies Friday night and died of a heart attack at the hospital. An Associated Press report said that though the temperature at the start of the program was 92°F (33.3°C), the medical examiner ruled that the death was not heat related and that the autopsy revealed that Pietrasik had a history of heart problems.

  • Of the 391 people who received medical treatment at the Olympic opening ceremonies, 51 had heat related problems, according to a report by the Associated Press.


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