The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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January 1997 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 25 - NO. 1 - JANUARY 97


Psychoactive Drugs and Athletic Performance

Athletes and nonathletes alike may be exposed to psychoactive substances if they use over-the-counter, recreational, or prescription drugs. Some of these have ergogenic side effects, but many hurt performance by affecting the cardiovascular system or impairing judgment. The author discusses the actions of psychoactive drugs and their use by athletes.

Thomas L. Schwenk, MD


Hypothyroidism Presenting as Tendinitis

When a middle-aged triathlete complained of knee pain, the problem was diagnosed as tendinitis. He went on to develop pain in other joints along with excessive fatigue before he was found months later to have hypothyroidism. His case shows how considering hypothyroidism in the differential diagnosis for overuse syndromes can speed proper treatment.

William D. Knopp, MD; Matthew E. Bohm, MD; James C. McCoy, MD


Low-Back Pain: Consider Extension Education

Most of the time, low-back pain is a self-limiting condition that resolves in a few weeks with conservative treatment, including early mobilization. The McKenzie technique can help identify appropriate rehabilitation exercises. For most patients, the best bet is extension—not flexion—exercises.

Louis Kuritzky, MD, with Jacqueline White

Patient Adviser: Extend Yourself for Low-Back Pain Relief

Louis Kuritzky, MD, with Jacqueline White


Imaging Quiz: Calf Pain in a Recreational Basketball Player

A man had pain in his right calf after a basketball injury. Despite conservative treatment, the pain was worse a week later. Take a look at the magnetic resonance image of his calf and see if you can make the diagnosis.

Bryan D. Caldwell, DPM, MS


Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Detection, Differentiation, and Treatment

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are common in the young athletic population and present considerable challenges. Often there are no symptoms, and even when there are, distinguishing between different infections can be difficult. The author describes diagnosis and treatment for most STDs, stressing the importance of preventive education.

James R. Clark, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
STDs—Part of Primary Care


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Editorial Board/Staff


Forum
Concussion Clarification


News Briefs
Court Affirms Right to Disqualify Athletes


Pearls


Highlights
Low-Back Pain in Children; Lifestyle Changes for Hypertension


Calendar


Reviewer Thanks


CME Self Test


Index to Advertisers


Nutrition Adviser
Facts About Fish: Don't Miss Its Benefits
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Exercise Adviser
Choosing and Using Exercise Equipment
Bryant Stamford, PhD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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