The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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March 1997 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 25 - NO. 3 - MARCH 97


Treating Corneal Abrasions and Lacerations

Corneal abrasions and lacerations injure the "windshield" of the eye, exposing the patient to potential vision loss and infection. The author explains when and how to treat and when to refer.

Bruce M. Zagelbaum, MD


Update on Exercise-Induced Asthma: A Report of the Olympic Exercise Asthma Summit Conference

Exercise-induced asthma keeps multitudes from doing their best in exercise and sports. Effective treatment is available, but EIA is easily overlooked. This report from a recent conference offers the latest on identifying and managing EIA so that patients can work out the way they want.

William W. Storms, MD; David M. Joyner, MD


Managing Ankle Sprains: Keys to Preserving Motion and Strength

Most ankle injuries involve the lateral supporting ligaments, and most can be managed successfully in the primary care setting. This practical guide to treatment stresses the value of applying a focal compression device as early as possible.

James G. Garrick, MD, with Patrice Heinz Schelkun


Teen Violence Prevention: How to Make a Brief Encounter Make a Difference

Far too many adolescents are entangled in violent behavior. Seizing the moment to gauge involvement and counsel appropriately can be done at any brief visit—even the preparticipation physical or a sports injury assessment. The author shares specific, practical techniques that have worked in his practice.

Kenneth R. Ginsburg, MD, MS Ed


Osteochondritis Dissecans in a Young Pitcher: Why Early Recognition Matters

A dedicated teenage pitcher was troubled by chronic elbow soreness and stiffness. By the time his osteochondral injury was clearly identified, it was too late to prevent a permanent effect on his elbow. The author describes how to prevent this sort of outcome.

Jack T. Andrish, MD


Roundtable
Team Management of the Female Athlete Triad: Part 1: What to Look for, What to Ask

Athletic women and girls who are dedicated to thinness can fall prey to the ominous combination of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Patients' defenses may make the diagnosis hard to confirm, but knowing the signs and asking the right questions will help.

Elizabeth Joy, MD; Nancy Clark, MS, RD; Mary Lloyd Ireland, MD; Joseph Martire, MD; Aurelia Nattiv, MD; Steve Varechok, LCSW


Commentary
Preparticipation Cardiovascular Screening: Toward a National Standard

Is it time for mandatory, standardized cardiovascular screening for all high school and college athletes? The author says yes, and explains why.

David L. Herbert, JD


Sports Medicine Fellowships for Physicians


Departments


Editor's Notes
Thwarting Teen Violence, One-on-One


Coming in Sportsmedicine


Editorial Board/Staff


News Briefs
Female Gymnasts: Older—and Healthier?


Pearls


Highlights
Exercise Improves Sleep; Bike Helmets Save Face


Forum


Calendar


Employment Opportunities


Information for Authors


Nutrition Adviser
Take Time for a Good Lunch
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Exercise Adviser
Skin Care for Active People
Michael L. Ramsey, MD


CME Self Test


Index to Advertisers


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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