The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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June 1997 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 25 - NO. 6 - JUNE 97


Emergencies

Heat Illness: On-Site Diagnosis and Cooling

When a patient appears to have heat illness, it's essential to obtain an accurate core temperature reading. Severe hyperthermia and mental status changes may signal heatstroke, one of the most serious emergencies in sports. Quick cooling is imperative.

Richard P. Sandor, MD


Tibial Fracture in a Basketball Player: Treatment Dilemmas and Complications

A young basketball player suffered a spiral fracture of the tibia with an intact fibula when he attempted a jump. After internal fixation of the fracture, his recovery was complicated by delayed union of the fragments, which necessitated further surgical treatment.

Tim C. Garl, MPH, ATC; Larry Alexander, MS, ATC; Steven K. Ahlfeld, MD; Larry Rink, MD; Brad J. Bomba Sr, MD


Rotator Cuff Injury: Addressing Overhead Overuse

For many active patients, the price of repeated overhead motions is a damaged rotator cuff. Physical tests and imaging studies can help pinpoint the location and extent of injury and determine the appropriate treatment.

Preston M. Wolin, MD; Joyce A. Tarbet, MD


Nutrition Supplements: Science vs Hype

Supplements such as creatine monohydrate, chromium picolinate, L-carnitine, and dehydroepiandrosterone are popular with some active people because of reputed ergogenic or anabolic effects. But a lack of federal regulation raises questions about the purity of these products, and the research done so far leaves their safety and efficacy in doubt.

Thomas D. Armsey Jr, MD; Gary A. Green, MD


Imaging Quiz: Fever of Undetermined Origin in a Soldier

An athletic young soldier had a 5-week history of fever, weight loss, and malaise. See if you can make the diagnosis from his lab test values and whole-body gallium scan.

Carlos E. Jiménez, MD; Inku Hwang, MD


Primary Care Sports Medicine in the Managed Care Environment: Coping in Today's Culture

Managed care organizations impose restrictions that can impede optimal care for athletes, but the right tactics can help cut the obstacles down to size.

Michael Henehan, DO; Robert Jones, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
You Can Call Us 'SportsMedicine'


Editorial Board/Staff


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


News Briefs
Bikers Frequently Fracture Clavicle
Choosing the Best Exercise for Seniors
World Medical Games: A Jock Doc's Dream


Scanning Sports


Pearls


Forum
Manipulation for Myofascial Pain


Highlights
Imaging of Scaphoid Fractures
Body Fat and Heart Disease


Nutrition Adviser
Get to Know Grains
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Exercise Adviser
The Right Way to Do Sit-Ups
Bryant Stamford, PhD


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Index to Advertisers


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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