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[EDITOR'S NOTES]

Survivin' Sneezin' Season

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 25 - NO. 8 - AUGUST 97


For those who have "hay fever"—like me—it's time once again for fall pollens to mess up our lives. At least, that's how it used to be. Not long ago, the only help for the sneezing fits, profuse rhinorrhea, and itchy eyes was antihistamines—which made me too sleepy to think coherently. I'd try to abstain from lecturing during hay fever season—partly because of the incoherence, but mostly because I didn't want to subject the medical students to microphone-amplified sneezing and nose blowing. Meanwhile, the rest of my life went to pot, too: Exercise motivation, productivity, and health all plunged.

Then the nasal inhaled corticosteroids and nonsedating antihistamines came on the market, and my life (and the medical students') was almost back to normal—even in the superpollinated Midwest in August and September.

Your allergic patients who want to stay active, especially those who practice outdoor summer and fall sports, are also suffering at this time of year. Proper medication, plus heeding a little cautionary advice such as "don't run through fields of ragweed," may change their lives, too. Author Malcolm N. Blumenthal, MD, in his article "Managing Allergies in Active People," expands on this commonsense advice to help patients with even severe seasonal and nonseasonal allergies stay active and productive.

For year-round help with your patients' medical concerns, don't miss other practical articles in this issue, such as "Recognizing Upper-Extremity Stress Lesions," by Thomas D. Cervoni, MD, and colleagues; "Insidious Illness in Active Seniors: Decoding Atypical Presentations," by Carlos E. Jiménez, MD, and colleagues; and—second in our new "Exercise Is Medicine" series—"Treating Low-Back Pain: Exercise Knowns and Unknowns," by Brian Shiple, DO.

Each month, we bring you information to help you treat all your active patients, from those just getting off the couch to the marathoner—any of whom could come into your office sneezing today.

Cordially,
Richard H. Strauss, MD
Editor-in-Chief


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