The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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October 1997 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 25 - NO. 10 - OCTOBER 97


Emergencies

Field Splinting of Suspected Fractures: Preparation, Assessment, and Application

When an athlete injures a limb, one decision that has to be made quickly is how to protect the injured part until treatment can be given. Here are tips on injury assessment and on which preformed splints and adaptable splinting materials are appropriate for common injuries.

Randall M. Meredith, MD; Janus D. Butcher, MD


Atypical Pneumonia in Active Patients: Clues, Causes, and Return to Play

'Walking pneumonia' can affect young, otherwise healthy persons. Those who are in close contact with others, such as students and sports team members, are at elevated risk. Complications are rare, but they can be serious, so caution is important in permitting return to play.

Thomas J. Melham, MD


Case Report
Scapular Fracture in a High School Football Player

Fractured scapulas are not often seen in patients other than traffic accident victims. But in the athlete described here, what at first looked like a rotator cuff sprain turned out to be a scapular body fracture.

J. P. McBryde, MD


Does Exercise Truly Enhance Sleep?

Experience and common sense suggest that exercise improves sleep, but science has yet to fully support the idea. Still, the latest studies offer important clues about the effects of exercise duration, intensity, and timing on sleep length and quality.

Shawn D. Youngstedt, PhD


Refining Rehabilitation With Proprioception Training: Expediting Return to Play

Musculoskeletal injuries not only hamper movement, but also impair proprioception—the sense of joint position. Exercises to improve proprioception, illustrated here, can help prevent injuries in healthy athletes and help injured athletes return to peak condition.

Edward R. Laskowski, MD; Karen Newcomer-Aney, MD; Jay Smith, MD


In My Experience
Insulin as an Anabolic Aid?: A Danger for Strength Athletes

This story of a chance encounter with a muscular young man in acute distress illustrates the peril of taking insulin for muscle building. What the young man knew and didn't know about insulin is highly instructive.

J. Warren Willey II, DO


Pain Relief for Acute Soft-Tissue Injuries

Pain specialists and others discuss how to use pain-control measures to speed healing and help active patients start rehabilitation early without tempting them to overdo it. In a sidebar, a football team physician offers an insider's perspective on the use of painkillers in pro sports.

James S. Thornton


Departments


Editor's Notes
Right Medication, Wrong Use


Editorial Board/Staff


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Calendar


Pearls


Highlights


Forum


Information for Authors


Nutrition Adviser
Eating for Peak Performance
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD

(see also, "Top Contenders: Foods to Fuel Fitness," page 60)


Exercise Adviser
Team Up for Thigh Stretches
John G. Aronen, MD


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Index to Advertisers


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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