The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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April 192021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 26 - NO. 4 - APRIL 2021


Anniversary Commentary
Medicine in Motion

Douglas B. McKeag, MD


Premenstrual Syndrome: Systematic Diagnosis and Individualized Therapy

A 2-month chart that makes it easy for patients to track their symptoms helps physicians clarify whether the patient suffers from premenstrual syndrome or another condition in the extensive differential.

Scott Ransom, DO, MBA; Julie Moldenhauer, MD


Exercise Is Medicine
Active Control of Hypertension

Exercise has three roles in the treatment of hypertension: prevention, initial treatment for mild elevations, and an adjunct to medication moderate or severe hypertension. Exercise can best reduce blood pressure when the patient's activity routine is regular and aerobic.

Alfred A. Bove, MD, with Carl Sherman

Patient Adviser
Low-Pressure Workouts for Hypertension

Alfred A. Bove, MD, with Carl Sherman


Fibromyalgia: Recognizing and Treating an Elusive Syndrome

A working knowledge of the diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia helps physicians institute the two most important management strategies: reversing the precipitating factor and relieving symptoms. Understanding the role of exercise is also important, because it can be both a precipitant and a treatment.

Richard B. Gremillion, MD


Delayed Complication of a Rib Fracture

Sports-related rib fractures usually heal uneventfully with conservative care. However, as a case study shows, serious complications can develop several days after the injury—underscoring the importance of removing a patient with a possible rib fracture from play.

John O'Kane, MD; Elizabeth O'Kane, MD; Julianne Marquet, MD


When Groin Pain Is More Than 'Just a Strain': Navigating a Broad Differential

When an active patient presents with groin pain, it's natural to consider first the most obvious causes: explosive muscle contractions, cutting maneuvers, overstretching, and overuse. However, the diagnostic possibilities encompass a complex range of musculoskeletal and nonmusculoskeletal causes when the patient's pain is chronic or when the patient is a child or older adult.

Joseph J. Ruane, DO; Thomas A. Rossi, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Gluing Minor Skin Wounds


Editorial Board/Staff


Forum


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


News Briefs
Casey Martin's Case: The Medical Story


Classified Advertising


Pearls


Highlights
Intense Intervention for Smokers


Information for Authors


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Nutrition Adviser
Jumping for Soy
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Exercise Adviser
A Traveler's Workout Guide
Bryant Stamford, PhD


Clinical Techniques
Suture Substitutes: Using Skin Adhesives
Aaron Rubin, MD


Index to Advertisers


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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