The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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May 192021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 26 - NO. 5 - MAY 2021


25th Anniversary Commentary

Keeping Sports Safe
Physicians Should Take the Lead

William O. Roberts, MD


Foot Problems in Middle-Aged Patients
Keeping Active People Up to Speed

Active adults are susceptible to a wide variety of foot problems. Fortunately, the conservative treatments described in this generously illustrated article work most of the time.

Catherine M. Coady, MD; Nina Gow, MD; William Stanish, MD


Managing Abrasions and Lacerations

In sports, initial wound management depends partly on plans for return to play. Here is a review of the fundamentals of suturing and other aspects of wound care with special attention to issues in sports.

Aaron Rubin, MD


Achilles Tendon Nodule
Inflammation, Rupture, or Tumor?

When a 52-year-old man presented with a slowly growing mass on his Achilles tendon, histologic examination was the key to the diagnosis.

MAJ Daniel J. Schissel, MD; LTC Dirk M. Elston, MD


Vocal Cord Dysfunction
Don't Mistake It for Asthma

A young person who wheezes during activity has exercise-induced asthma, right? Not always. Vocal cord dysfunction—partial closing of the vocal cords during inspiration—closely mimics asthma. Confusing the two can be hard on the patient.

Susan M. Brugman, MD; Stephen M. Simons, MD


After the Fall: Symptoms in Bungee Jumpers

Of 100 people who made a bungee jump, 42 had medical complaints—all minor—afterward. Dizziness led the list of symptoms.

Craig C. Young, MD; William G. Raasch, MD; Melbourne D. Boynton, MD


Commentary

Strength Training for Women
Debunking Myths That Block Opportunity

William P. Ebben, MS, MSSW, CSCS; Randall L. Jensen, PhD


ECG Quiz

Acute Dyspnea and a New Murmur in a Team Physician

A 61-year-old physician had transient dyspnea and palpitations while playing basketball, and the dyspnea recurred in ensuing weeks. What do his chest x-ray, ECG, and other clinical features suggest?

John D. Cantwell, MD; David T. Watson, MD; William A. Blincoe, MD; James R. Kauten, MD


Departments


Editorial Board/Staff


Editor's Notes
Activating Internal Medicine


Highlights
Ottawa Knee Rule Decreases Xrays;
High Fat Intake May Reduce Stroke Risk


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Pearls


Calendar


News Briefs
DHEA: Hype vs Facts
Lyme Disease: New Tools


Scanning Sports


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Nutrition Adviser
Sense and Food Sensitivity: Coping With Allergies and Food Intolerance
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Exercise Adviser
Timely Tips for Tennis Types
Lloyd Nesbitt, DPM


Classified Advertising


Index to Advertisers


Clinical Techniques
Tub Cooling for Exertional Heatstroke
William O. Roberts, MD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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