The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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August 192021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 26 - NO. 8 - AUGUST 2021


Anniversary Commentary

The Fit Woman of the 21st Century
Making Lifelong Exercise the Norm

Many of today's women are less active than their great-grandmothers were. In the realm of women's fitness, it may be time to go back to the future.

Angela D. Smith, MD


Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Knee

Generalized or anterior knee pain in an active adolescent may signal the cartilage fragmentation known as osteochondritis dissecans. This practical article uses case reports, radiographs, other illustrations, and a staging chart to explain diagnosis and treatment.

Thomas W. Wang, MD; Willliam D. Knopp, MD; Charles A. Bush-Joseph, MD; Bernard R. Bach, Jr, MD


Managing Common Stress Fractures
Let Risk Level Guide Treatment

Most stress fractures surrender quietly, with rest and correction of training errors. But some can progress to complete fracture or refuse to heal unless treatment is more aggressive. The authors explain how to spot and arrest these troublemakers.

Peter Brukner, MBBS; Chris Bradshaw, MBBS; Kim Bennell, PhD


Exercise Is Medicine

Congestive Heart Failure
Training for a Better Life

A rising tide of research is washing away the belief that patients who have congestive heart failure should be motionless. An appropriate exercise program can increase exercise tolerance; reduce dyspnea, fatigue, and the risk of arrhythmias; and generally make life better.

James R. Clark, MD, with Carl Sherman


Diagnosing and Treating Onychomycosis

Many people who are physically active or older have onychomycosis, but they don't have to just put up with it anymore. The latest generation of drugs for this stubborn fungal infection produces high cure rates.

Mark P. Seraly, MD, with Mark L. Fuerst


Emergencies

On-Site Management of Nasal Injuries

When an athlete gets hit in the nose, the examining physician's first job is to decide whether to treat or refer. Sports-related nasal injuries usually are isolated and can be treated by a primary physician who understands nasal anatomy and function.

Thomas Stackhouse, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Exercise Made Easy


Highlights
Intense Exercise Safe During Pregnancy
Ice Massage vs Ice Bag


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Editorial Board/Staff


News Briefs
ACSM Makes Exercise Advice More Flexible
Fitness Clubs Urged to Do Cardiac Screening
Running to Fight Leukemia


Pearls


Calendar


Classified Advertising


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Index to Advertisers


Nutrition Adviser
Food Safety for Your Active Summer
Susan M. Kleiner, PhD, RD


Exercise Adviser
Fitting in Fitness: Exercise Options for Busy People
Bryant Stamford, PhD


Clinical Techniques
On-Site Treatment of PIP Joint Dislocations
Edward R. McDevitt, MD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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