The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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September 1998 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 26 - NO. 9 - SEPTEMBER 98


Anniversary Commentary

Return to Play: Making the Tough Decisions

More and more patients want to know when they can get back to their sport or exercise after an injury or illness. Outcome data to help guide the decision are mostly absent, so physicians must rely on careful judgment.

Margot Putukian, MD


Managing Injuries of the Great Toe

Common injuries to the great toe range from annoying blisters and calluses to disabling fractures and dislocations. Most of the time—especially if the problem is diagnosed early—conservative treatment does the job.

R. Sean Churchill, MD; Brian G. Donley, MD


Wrist Injuries: Part 1: Pinpointing Pathology in a Complex Joint

When a patient has an injured wrist, making a diagnosis more specific than "wrist sprain" can be difficult. The author uses detailed instructions along with anatomic drawings and photos of provocative tests to help you figure out what's going on.

Eric W. Honing, MD


Bilateral Shoulder Pain: Psoriatic Arthritis Masquerading as Overuse

As this case report shows, an active person who has psoriatic arthritis may think for a long time that the problem is sports-related—as may his or her physician. A careful history and physical exam will unmask the real cause of the symptoms, opening the way for effective treatment.

Mario F. Ciocca, Jr, MD


Fat Burning During Exercise: Can Ergogenics Change the Balance?

Dieters, athletes, and exercisers often wonder how much fat is burned during exercise and how they can increase the oxidation of fat while conserving carbohydrate. This article explains fuel metabolism during exercise and analyzes purported ergogenic aids like L-carnitine and caffeine.

John A. Hawley, PhD


Chest Pain and a 'Normal' Exercise ECG in a 44-Year-Old Runner

After an episode of chest pain, a runner underwent an exercise test. His electrocardiogram was read as normal. Take a close look at the ECG and other clues and see if you agree.

John D. Cantwell, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
My Final Editor's Notes


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Editorial Board/Staff


Highlights
Healthy Habits Postpone Disability
Baseball and Beer


News Briefs
Study Critiques Cardiac Screening of Athletes
Leptospirosis Cases Linked to Triathlons
News From the AOSSM Annual Meeting


Letters to the Editor
Osgood-Schlatter Treatment; Injection Objections


Classified Advertising


Pearls


Calendar


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Index to Advertisers


Nutrition Adviser
Eating Before Competing
Nancy Clark, MS, RD


Clinical Techniques
A Silicone Splint for Auricular Hematoma
Sandra E. Lane, MD; Gary L. Rhame, DO; Randall L. Wroble, MD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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