The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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March 1999 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 27 - NO. 3 - MARCH 99


Volleyball Injuries
Managing Acute and Overuse Disorders

Volleyball players suffer injuries that might be expected from jumping high and swatting a ball; most common are patellar tendinitis, shoulder tendinitis, ankle sprains, and thumb sprains. Suprascapular neuropathy, a disorder of overhead athletes, is also common.

William W. Briner, Jr, MD; Holly J. Benjamin, MD


Physical Activity and Epilepsy
What Are the Rules?

Too often, fear needlessly keeps epilepsy patients from activity. Seizures during exercise are rare, and though some sports are risky, many are quite safe. Clinicians need to consider that some antiepileptic drugs affect performance and that exertion may affect serum drug levels.

Joseph I. Sirven, MD; Jay Varrato, MD


Managing Atrial Fibrillation in Active Patients and Athletes

Atrial fibrillation is less common and better tolerated in young or middle-aged active persons than in the elderly, but it can be a problem when activities demand a high cardiac output. It usually can be controlled by correcting risk factors and/or treating with drugs or electrocardioversion.

Robert A. Reiss, MD


Finger Joint Injuries in Active Patients
Pointers for Acute and Late-Phase Management

If you have trouble remembering the difference between 'mallet finger' and boutonniere deformity or between volar plates and collateral ligaments, here's help. This practical article covers most of the common finger joint injuries, including when and how to treat and when to refer.

Allan W. Bach, MD


Lessons from Atypical Groin Pain
Presentation and Treatment of a Schwannoma

The case of a teen who had knee, groin, and hip pain after a touch football game offers lessons in thoroughness and persistence. When pain recurred after conservative treatment, MRI revealed a spinal mass.

Sandra E. Lane, MD; Vijay G.R. Kumar, MD; Lawrence J. Mervis, MD; Dusty Rhodes, MD


The Deceptive Nature of Clavicle Fractures in Young Patients

What looks a lot like an acromioclavicular separation in an adolescent may be a distal clavicle fracture instead, as illustrated in a case report. The difference is important because some AC separations require surgical repair.

Megan Schimpf; Carlos Neira, MD; Edward G. McFarland, MD


Sports Medicine Fellowships for Primary Care Physicians


Departments


Editorial Board


Editor's Notes
Musculoskeletal Medicine: How to Strengthen Training


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Staff


News Briefs
Med School Graduates Weak in Musculoskeletal Knowledge
IOC Conference Produces Plan for Antidoping Agency


Letters to the Editor
Defective Use of Data on Heading the Ball?
Fiber and Blood Lipids
Vegetarian vs Plant-Based Diet for Athletes


Highlights
Moderate Exercise OK With URI
Conservative Treatment Affirmed for Patellofemoral Pain


Calendar


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Classified Advertising


Index to Advertisers


Pearls


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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