The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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April 1999 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 27 - NO. 4 - APRIL 99


Hypertension in Athletes and Active Patients
Tailoring Treatment to the Patient

Blood pressure may rise dramatically during exercise, and this response can be more pronounced in people who have hypertension. But those who have hypertension can work out or compete in sports, and doing so may even help them control their condition.

John M. MacKnight, MD


Swimming Injuries and Illnesses

Competitive swimmers swim up to 15,000 yards daily in training, and shoulder pain is an all-too-common result. Swimmers also suffer from ear infections, folliculitis, asthma, and overtraining syndrome. Treatment includes emphasizing the importance of good swimming technique.

LT C. Scott Kammer, MD; Craig C. Young, MD; Mark W. Niedfeldt, MD


Exercise Is Medicine

Exercise in Diabetes Management
Maximizing Benefits, Controlling Risks

Exercise offers multiple benefits for people who have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, including improved insulin sensitivity, lower blood glucose, and enhanced self-esteem. Caution is necessary in pursuing these benefits, however. Attention to medication dosage, blood glucose levels, and the timing and amount of food intake will help patients get the most out of exercise.

Russell D. White, MD, with Carl Sherman

Patient Adviser
Exercising With Diabetes: Tips, Strategies, and Precautions
Russell D. White, MD, with Carl Sherman


Olecranon Fracture Sustained in Arm Wrestling

A young man was going all-out to win an arm wrestling match when he felt a "pop" and a stab of elbow pain. Radiographs revealed a very unusual injury: an olecranon fracture that apparently was caused by a violent triceps contraction.

MAJ Paul F. Pasquina, MC, USA; LTC Francis G. O'Connor, MC, USA


Snowboarding Injuries
General Patterns, With a Focus on Talus Fractures

Snowboarders are injured no more often than downhill skiers, but their injury profile differs in other ways. Clinicians need to watch for fractures of the lateral process of the talus, which are rare outside snowboarding and are easy to mistake for a lateral ankle sprain.

Andrea J. Boon, MD; Jay Smith, MD; Edward R. Laskowski, MD


Departments


Editor's Notes
Sports Medicine: The Defensible 'Alternative'


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


Staff


News Briefs
Lyme Disease Vaccination: Who Needs It? How Effective?
New In-Office Test Speeds Lyme Disease Detection
News From the AAOS Annual Meeting
NBA Team Physicians Cope With Lockout Fallout


Highlights
Mapping Sensation Inside the Knee
High-Fat, High-Carb Diets Produce Similar Lipid Changes in Cyclists


Pearls


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Classified Advertising


Calendar


Letters to the Editor
Avoiding Muscle Soreness


Index to Advertisers


Clinical Techniques
Subacromial Space Injection: Pain Reliever, Diagnostic Tool
William O. Roberts, MD


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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