The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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July 1999 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 27 - NO. 7 - JULY 99


Keeping Sports Participants Safe in Hot Weather

During exercise, metabolic heat production can increase 10-fold to 20-fold over resting levels, making heat illness a big risk in hot weather. The author describes how to assess environmental heat stress, what acclimatization requires, and how athletes can stay well-hydrated (hint: it's a good idea to switch drinks after a workout). A sidebar reports on the heat-illness experience at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta.

Phillip B. Sparling, EdD; Mindy Millard-Stafford, PhD


Managing Golf Injuries
Technique and Equipment Changes That Aid Treatment

To treat and prevent golf injuries, shortening the backswing or getting clubs with larger grips may be as important as stretching, strengthening, and anti-inflammatories. The author discusses the most common injuries in amateur golfers and explains the role of golf technique and equipment in both causing and treating them.

CAPT John P. Metz, MD


Cysts and Other Masses About the Knee
Identifying and Treating Common and Rare Lesions

A mass in or near the knee joint will usually turn out to be a popliteal, ganglion, or meniscal cyst, but a number of other conditions must be considered as well. MRI often helps clinch the diagnosis if the history and physical aren't sufficient. In many cases, management of a cyst hinges on treating underlying pathology, such as arthritis or a meniscal tear.

Warren D. Yu, MD; Matthew S. Shapiro, MD


Clinical Techniques
Dorsal Dislocations of the MCP Joint: Assessment and Closed Reduction

The clinical signs of simple and complex dorsal dislocations of the metacarpophalangeal joint are different. Recognizing the difference is important, because a simple dislocation can be reduced in closed fashion, whereas a complex injury usually requires surgery.

CAPT Edward R. McDevitt, MD


Departments


Editorial Board


Editor's Notes
Welcome, New Editors! Strengthening the Journal, Serving the Readers


Continuing Sportsmedicine Education


News Briefs
Homocysteine and Heart Disease: A Culprit, or Just a Suspect?
News From the ACSM Annual Meeting


Pearls


Highlights
Strength Training Bolsters Cardiac Rehab
New Test for Superior Labral Tears of the Shoulder
Cardiovascular Disease Risk Higher in Minority Youth
New Device Measures Compartment Pressure


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Staff


Index to Advertisers


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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