The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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November 1999 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 27 - NO. 12 - NOVEMBER 99


Commentary
Hitting in Amateur Ice Hockey: Not Worth the Risk

Sheathed in helmets and padding, school-age male hockey players mimic the bone-jarring checking that defines pro hockey. An ex-player reviews the injury data and contends that the amateur game would be safer and better without checking.

William O. Roberts, MD


Advantages of Diagnostic Nuclear Medicine
Part 1: Musculoskeletal Disorders

The ability to show blood perfusion patterns and bone metabolic activity makes radionuclide scanning a powerful tool for detecting stress fractures, periostitis, myositis ossificans, and other musculoskeletal injuries. And recent advances such as three-phase scanning have improved the yield.

Carlos E. Jimenez, MD


Exercise-Induced Asthma

Exercise-induced asthma curtails activity for far too many children and adults. Here is a thorough update on spotting this common condition and choosing among the many available treatments, including exercise strategies and medications.

Vincent J. Lacroix, MD


Lumbar Facet Fracture in an Adolescent Hockey Player

When a young hockey player suffered low-back pain and intermittent fevers, neither he nor his physicians initially linked the symptoms with his sport. It took considerable sleuthing to ascertain that the problem was a facet fracture from a hit during a game.

William O. Shaffer, MD; Michael R. Taylor, PAC, ATC; Murali Sundaram, MD


ECG Quiz
Acute Onset of Chest Pain in a Soccer Player

An adult soccer player was suddenly beset by chest pain, nausea, presyncope, and diaphoresis. His distress included an inability to lie flat. Given his presentation, what does his ECG suggest?

David S. Ross, MD; Gary Cooper, MD


Skeletal Muscle Cramps During Exercise

Muscle cramps during exercise have long been blamed on electrolyte imbalances, but a new and different theory fits the evidence better. The author links an explanation of this theory with practical guidance on treating and preventing acute cramps and searching out the cause of recurrent cramping.

Martin P. Schwellnus, MBBCh, MSc (Med), MD


Departments


Editorial Board


Editor's Notes
Our Readers as Leaders


Staff


News Briefs
New Drugs Should Help Fight Influenza This Winter
A New Guide for Assessing Heart Disease Risk
Relief for Side Stitches


Pearls


Highlights
Women Have Increased Knee-Joint Laxity
Snowboarder Injury Risks Exceed Those of Alpine Skiers


CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm


Letters to the Editor
Correction: 'Allergen-Mediated Disease'
Questionable Allergy Drugs?


Classified Advertising


Information for Authors


Index to Advertisers


Exercise Adviser
How to Buy Athletic Shoes
Lloyd Nesbitt, DPM


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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