The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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June 2002 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 30 - NO. 6 - JUNE 2002


NEWS AND ANALYSIS

Editor's Notes
A Little 'Sports' Medicine Miracle
Elizabeth A. Joy, MD

News Briefs
Pole Vault Deaths Spur Safety Concerns
Softer Impact for Motor Sports
Human Transporters Carry Risks

Best of the Literature
Physical Activity in the Elderly Reduces Inflammation
Exercise Increases Muscle Mass in Those With Low-Back Pain


CASE REPORT

Hypertension in a Young Golfer
The preparticipation exam is one of the only opportunities physicians have to screen for hypertension in young people. Determining the underlying condition and risk factors has a high payoff, because the hypertension is usually reversible. In this patient's case, the cause was coarctation of the aorta that had previously been asymptomatic. After surgery, the patient returned to golf.
Martha I. Pyron, MD


REVIEW ARTICLES

Tibial Stress Injuries
Decisive Diagnosis and Treatment of 'Shin Splints'
Exercise-induced shin pain requires a lot of detective work to rule out other conditions such as anterior compartment syndrome and to pinpoint the factors, such as training techniques or muscle weakness, that have contributed to the patient's injury. The best clues are pain patterns, physical exam characteristics, and findings on triple-phase bone scan or limited MRI. Modifying risk factors and a graded return to sport are the keys to successful treatment.
CAPT Christopher J. Couture, MD; Kristine A. Karlson, MD

Metabolic Myopathies and Physical Activity
When Fatigue Is More Than Simple Exertion
When patients experience fatigue and muscle cramps beyond the period of exercise adaptation, physicians should consider metabolic myopathies in the differential diagnosis. Though rare, the most common conditions seen in active patients are myoadenylate deaminase deficiency and disorders such as McArdle's disease. A targeted patient family history and basic laboratory studies help rule out conditions that mimic metabolic myopathies. More advanced tests such as muscle biopsy are often needed to establish a definitive diagnosis.
Mark A. Tarnopolsky, MD, PhD


CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
When Young Patients Have Heel Pain
Finding a Patient's Optimal Knee Zone
Tip for Detecting Popliteal Cysts


READER SERVICE

Staff

CME Self Test
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In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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