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October 2002 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 30 - NO. 10 - OCTOBER 2002


NEWS AND ANALYSIS

Editor's Notes
Feeling Connected? Or Just Plain Wired?
Gordon O. Matheson, MD, PhD

News Briefs
Pet Project: Can Animals Influence Lifestyle Changes?
A Dehydration Link to Altitude Sickness?
Pediatricians Call for Handlebar Standards
Are Certain Sports Risk Factors for Eating Disorders?

Best of the Literature
Shocking Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis
Keeping 'Em Active After Injury
Obese Kids Sing the Sugar Blues
Cool Weather and Glucose Oxidation


REVIEW ARTICLES

Does Training Affect Growth?
Answers to Common Questions
Medical literature suggests only mild, temporary delays, but interindividual differences can be dramatic. Monitoring activity level and growth will flag those at risk.
Robin M. Daly, PhD; Shona Bass, PhD; Dennis Caine, PhD; Warren Howe, MD

Evaluation and Management of the Unstable Patella
About half of patients with acute or recurrent instability have ongoing episodes, and nearly a quarter quit their sport. A clinical exam that identifies the mechanism of injury and predisposing factors is the key to treatment.
Andrew J. Cosgarea, MD; James A. Browne; Tae Kyun Kim, MD, PhD; Edward G. McFarland, MD

Exercise-Associated Amenorrhea
Are Altered Leptin Levels an Early Warning Sign?
Decreased leptin levels in amenorrheic athletes have been associated with inadequate nutrition, making dietary modification a treatment priority. Although unrealistic for some athletes, dietary changes may be acceptable for others.
Michelle P. Warren, MD; Russalind H. Ramos, MD; Emily M. Bronson


CASE REPORT

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease in a High School Tennis Player
The symptoms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, the most common inherited neurologic disorder, can mimic recurrent ankle sprains. Physical exam findings such as pes cavus or hammertoes raise the physician's suspicion. Early diagnosis and aggressive physical therapy can help patients prevent falls and sprains.
Teresa S. Stadler, MD; David Ross, MD


CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
Anemia Pointers for Diagnosis and Treatment
A Role for Bracing in Spondylolysis


READER SERVICE

Staff

CME Self Test
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In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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