The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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November 2021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 30 - NO. 11 - NOVEMBER 2021


NEWS AND ANALYSIS

Editor's Notes
The Night Sky Has Dimmed: Sports Medicine Loses a Star Physician and Friend
Ian Shrier, MD, PhD; Julia Alleyne, MD, BHSC(PT)

News Briefs
What's Behind the Women-Only Fitness Center Boom?
Soda Pop: Friend or Foe?
Skateboard Injuries Double

Best of the Literature
Beta Agonists and High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema
Shock Treatment for 'Tennis Elbow'?
Phytoestrogens for Stronger Bones
Tibial Tunnel Angle Affects ACL Reconstruction

Guest Editorial
The Future of Performance-Enhancing Substances in Sport
Michael S. Bahrke, PhD; Charles E. Yesalis, MPH, ScD


REVIEW ARTICLES

Exercise and Coronary Artery Disease
Assessing Causes and Managing Risks
Exercise can trigger cardiac events, even in presumably fit patients. Knowing how exercise affects cardiac parameters can guide the screening of patients who have risk factors. However, one of the most prudent approaches is teaching patients to recognize exercise-related cardiac symptoms.
Joseph R. Libonati, PhD; Helene L. Glassberg, MD

Sacroiliac Joint Pain Syndrome in Active Patients
A Look Behind the Pain
The sacroiliac joint is a frequent target of sports-related trauma and repetitive stress. Pain referral patterns can complicate the diagnosis. Pain provocation testing and fluoroscopy injections are the most useful tools for making a specific diagnosis. Pain usually resolves once kinetic chain alterations are corrected with physical therapy.
Yung C. Chen, MD; Michael Fredericson, MD; Matthew Smuck, MD

Infectious Mononucleosis in Active Patients
Definitive Answers to Common Questions
Young people are well into their sports and college routine now, prompting physicians to think about infectious mononucleosis. Answers to some of the more complex questions will keep physicians well prepared.
Paul G. Auwaerter, MD


CASE REPORT

Femoral Head Contusion Without Hip Dislocation
Low-Energy Trauma in a Female Basketball Player
Femoral head contusions have been reported with traumatic hip dislocation. Sometimes, though, such contusions can occur without hip dislocation, as in this basketball player who had recurrent groin pain.
Sean T. Bryan, MD; John M. McShane, MD; Mark E. Schweitzer, MD


CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
When AED Leads Don't Stick
Averting Heat Cramps
Watchful Spondy Follow-Up
Simplified Thumb Evaluation


READER SERVICE

Staff

CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm

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In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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