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February 2021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 32 - NO. 2 - FEBRUARY 2021

NEWS AND ANALYSIS           

News Briefs
Sports Medicine Moves Toward Specialty Status: A New Certification for Orthopedic Surgery • Bush Addresses Drugs in Sport • Staggering Costs of Obesity • FDA Bans Ephedrine-Containing Supplements • Walking Holds the Line on Obesity

Best of the Literature
Activity and DASH for Lower Blood Pressure • Slackers Not at Increased Risk of Low-Back Pain

REVIEW ARTICLES

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Matching Exercise to Symptom Fluctuations
Many patients who have chronic fatigue syndrome fear exercise, but, paradoxically, exercise may improve some symptoms. Though exercise testing appears to be well tolerated, certain precautions are suggested. The exercise prescription hinges on a patient's condition and disease fluctuations. Most can tolerate low-impact activities such as walking or swimming.
James S. Skinner, PhD

RESEARCH REPORT

Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women
Does Exercise Training Make a Difference?
Few studies have examined what type of exercise is most likely to preserve bone density. A meta-analysis of 13 studies examined the effect that different exercise modes had on various skeletal sites and found that exercise had positive effects at the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck. The combination of aerobic exercise and strength training preserved bone density at the femoral neck.
Larry E. Miller, PhD; Sharon M. Nickols-Richardson, PhD, RD; Warren K. Ramp, PhD; Frank C. Gwazdauskas, PhD; Lawrence H. Cross, PhD; William G. Herbert, PhD

ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Medical Supervision of High School Football in Chicago
Does Inadequate Staffing Compromise Healthcare?
To assess if medical coverage of high school football has improved over the last 20 years, researchers surveyed medical supervision of football at Chicago public high schools. They found that levels of medical coverage are still extremely low and examine why medical coverage is lacking in this high-injury sport.
Pietro M. Tonino, MD; Matthew J. Bollier

CASE REPORT

Exertional Compartment Syndrome in an Equestrian
Does Inadequate Staffing Compromise Healthcare?
Heavy exertion is the usual suspect in activity-related compartment syndrome; however, as this case shows, the condition can arise from seemingly benign activities that create an unusual physical demand. In this instance, holding the foot in a prolonged position during horseback riding was the culprit.
David K. Lisle, MD; James B. Tucker, MD

CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
Solving a Muscle-Wasting Mystery • Knee Crepitus Scale

READER SERVICE

Staff

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CME Self Test
This test has expired, but additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm

Index 1990-2021


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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