The Physician and Sportsmedicine
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February 2005 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE - VOL 33 - NO. 2 - FEBRUARY 2005

NEWS AND ANALYSIS           
Editor's Notes
Sports Gone Wild, Part 1: Are We Part of the Problem?
Gordon O. Matheson, MD, PhD

Best of the Literature
How Much Is Enough? 'Weekend Warriors' Reap Exercise Benefits,Too • Female Maturation Influences ACL Injury Risk • A New Therapeutic Paradigm for Clavicle Nonunion?

News Briefs
Healing From War Injuries: A Sports Medicine Approach • Colleagues Remember Matt Roush, MD • Pairing Patients With the Right Diets: Studies Offer Guidance • Tracking Transient Spinal Cord Injury • Exercise Counseling: It Works

REVIEW ARTICLES

Sports Dermatology Series
Sideline Care of Abrasions and Lacerations
Preparation Is Key
Speed, physical contact, and sports equipment create ripe conditions for abrasions and lacerations. Being armed on the sidelines with the right equipment and the most current techniques can help athletes quickly return to play and avoid infection and poor cosmetic results.
Mark Bouchard, MD

Valgus Bracing for Degenerative Knee Osteoarthritis
Relieving Pain, Improving Gait, and Increasing Activity
Disability from knee osteoarthritis is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints that physicians manage, yet their treatment options have been narrowed recently by reports of cardiac consequences of some popular nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Valgus knee bracing is one nonpharmacologic option that may improve patients' gait, relieve their pain, and keep them active.
Jon G. Divine, MD; Timothy E. Hewett, PhD

CASE REPORTS

Juvenile Tillaux Fracture in an Adolescent Basketball Player
High ankle sprain symptoms in an adolescent patient should raise red flags for a possible Tillaux fracture. This case of a 16-year-old female basketball player illustrates the vulnerability of open physes to this injury, which is caused by forced external rotation of the foot. Surgery is often needed to avoid future complications.
Kyle J. Cassas, MD; John P. Jamison, MD

Primary Care of the Sports Hernia
Recognizing an Often-Overlooked Cause of Pain
Sports hernias account for much time lost from sports, so an observant physician who expedites treatment plays a key role in returning athletes to play. This case of a male professional soccer goalie demonstrates that sports hernia is often multifactorial. A focused physical exam and stepwise conservative treatment helped physicians isolate the injury.
Jason D. Johnson, MD; William W. Briner, Jr, MD

CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
A Nervy Tug-of-War Tip • On-the-Go Ice Pack • The '5 Ps' for New Marathoners

READER SERVICE

Staff

Classified Advertising

Index to Advertisers

CME Self Test
Additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm

Index 1990-2004


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


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