The Physician and Sportsmedicine
Menubar Home Journal Personal Health Resource Center CME Advertiser Services About Us

November 2021 Table of Contents

THE PHYSICIAN AND SPORTSMEDICINE
VOL 33 - NO. 11 - NOVEMBER 2021


NEWS AND ANALYSIS           

News Briefs
Fitness-Focused Phys Ed Reaps Benefits • WADA Modifies Prohibited List • Step Counts Rise When Physicians Promote Pedometer Use

REVIEW ARTICLES
Practice Essentials Series
Exertional Syncope and Presyncope
Faint Signs of Underlying Problems
Understanding the spectrum of exercise-related syncope and the physiologic processes that occur can help physicians make quick management decisions. Good background knowledge about syncope also enables practitioners to flag symptoms, such as fainting during activity rather than after, that should prompt a workup for a more serious arrhythmogenic or structural cause. Though most instances of presyncope and syncope are caused by benign neurocardiogenic causes, a focused physical exam and being aware of the benefits and pitfalls of various cardiac tests help streamline the diagnosis and assist with return-to-activity decisions.
KEVIN J. MCAWARD, MD; JAMES M. MORIARITY, MD

Sports Dermatology Series
Ominous Skin Lesion or Benign Sports-Related Imposter?
The Most Common 'Don't Miss' Diagnoses
The skin is the first line of defense for any active patient, and environmental elements, friction, and other factors often contribute to dermatologic lesions. Some sports-related lesions, such as talon noir or tennis toe, mimic skin cancer or other medical conditions. A review of the most common look-alikes helps physicians efficiently rule out the serious lesions so that they and patients can enjoy peace of mind with their activities.
KELLEY PAGLIAI REDBORD, MD; BRIAN B. ADAMS, MD, MPH

Competing With Crohn's Disease
Management Issues in Active Patients
Though moderate activity seems to protect patients against Crohn's disease, active people--even competitive athletes--aren't immune to the condition. The symptoms of Crohn's disease present several uncomfortable exercise obstacles, including abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea. Helping patients manage the symptoms with diet, medication, activity modification, and other lifestyle changes can help them safely enjoy the benefits of physical activity.
VICTOR K. NG, MSC; WANDA M. MILLARD, MD

CLINICAL PRACTICE

Pearls
•Exercise Options for Knee OA
•Layering Against the Cold



READER SERVICE

Staff

Editorial Board

Information for Authors

CME Self Test
Additional CME credit available at https://www.physsportsmed.com/cme.htm

Classified Advertising

Index to Advertisers

Index 1990-2021


In an effort to provide information that is scientifically accurate and consistent with accepted standards of medical practice, the editors and publisher of The Physician and Sportsmedicine routinely consult sources believed to be reliable. However, readers are encouraged to confirm this information with other sources. For example and in particular, physicians are advised to consult the prescribing information in the manufacturer's package insert before prescribing any drug mentioned.


RETURN TO BACK ISSUES INDEX

HOME  |   JOURNAL  |   PERSONAL HEALTH  |   RESOURCE CENTER  |   CME  |   ADVERTISER SERVICES  |   ABOUT US  |   SEARCH